Making Sense of Security Online Safety Tips

7 Best Online Safety Tips

Best 7 Online Safety Tips Video for Cybersecurity Awareness Month October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. Here are some basic online tips from Making Sense of Security to keep your digital activity safe. Don’t Give Out Personal Information Avoid online phishing attempts by keeping your personal information private. Don’t give out your phone number, social security information, or banking info to someone you don’t know. Create Complex Passwords Create passwords with a combination of letters, numbers, and symbols. Consider using password managers to create and keep track of your passwords. Check Website Reliability Before purchasing anything on a website ensure that it’s safe. You can do this by checking if it has a small lock icon or “https” before...

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month October - Making Sense of Security

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. Cybersecurity applies to the measures taken to protect a computer or computer system (as on the Internet) against unauthorized access or attack.  Here we at Making Sense of Security provide a few simple measures to help you stay safe in the digital world.  BASIC CYBERSECURITY BEST PRACTICES: MAKE A UNIQUE AND LONG PASSWORDThe Longer your password, the more complex it can become for hackers to crack. A strong password is at least 12 characters long. Focus on multiple characters that you like to think about and are easy to remember. Make sure you use more letters than numbers. Also include symbols [email protected]#$%^&*?>. BE CAUTIOUS OF WIFI HOTSPOTS  Public...

malicious malware

FBI hacks vulnerable US computers to fix malicious malware

FBI hacks vulnerable US computers to fix malicious malware The FBI has been hacking into the computers of US companies running insecure versions of Microsoft software in order to fix them, the US Department of Justice has announced. The operation, approved by a federal court, involved the FBI hacking into “hundreds” of vulnerable computers to remove malware placed there by an earlier malicious hacking campaign, which Microsoft blamed on a Chinese hacking group known as Hafnium. Hafnium’s operation placed backdoors into “tens of thousands” of servers running Microsoft’s Exchange software, which allows businesses to manage emails, contacts and calendars for their employees. It took advantage of a weakness in the servers, now fixed, to plant the malware, which allowed...

Telehealth

Check up on Your Virtual Safety: Tips for Telehealth Protection

Check up on Your Virtual Safety: Tips for Telehealth Protection In a poll conducted by the Canadian Medical Association, nearly half of Canadians have used telehealth services since the start of the pandemic. Additionally, in a recent McAfee study, we found that 21% of Canadians have used the internet for a doctor visit in 2020, and 28% said that such online visits will become a part of their routine moving forward Telehealth, or virtual care. This includes clinical services delivered remotely via electronic communications, such as videoconferencing, mobile apps and remote patient monitoring technology. Many of us have readily accepted these medical services out of necessity, as COVID have limited in-person hospital visits. Hackers are taking advantage of the...

New UK National Cyber Security Centre Head Warns that Cybersecurity Should be Taken More Seriously

New UK National Cyber Security Centre Head Warns that Cybersecurity Should be Taken More Seriously

Even though the UK has made ‘huge progress’ on cybersecurity efforts, the new Chief Executive of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) Lindy Cameron believes that the current efforts are still not enough. The new security head previously worked as a Director-General for the North Ireland office. She also worked for the Department for International Development (DfID), and was responsible for international programs in Africa and APAC. In her upcoming speech to Queen’s University Belfast, she will highlight the recent SolarWinds hack on US government agencies, and the Microsoft Exchange zero-day vulnerability as current real-world examples. In a highlight from her speech, she talks about the growing threat of ransomware and how it is affecting public schools/universities. She will...

prevent malware

A Discussion on How to Prevent Ransomware Attacks

Is your PC shielded against ransomware assaults? Ransomware is a kind of malware (vindictive programming) which crooks use to extract money. It holds info to payoff with encoding or by keeping clients locked from their gadgets. This article shows you everything to know on how to prevent ransomware attacks. We investigate the various approaches to shield your PC and your information from ransomware assaults. Pernicious programming that utilizes encoding to hold information for delivery has gotten fiercely effective in the most recent couple of years. The reason for this product is to blackmail cash from the casualties with guarantees of re-establishing encoded information. Like other PC infections, it finds its way onto a gadget by exploiting a security opening...

Ransomware Attacks Are Growing More Costly and Effective by the Day

Ransomware Attacks Are Growing More Costly and Effective by the Day

The availability of commodity bots and ransomware is making the business of ransomware accessible to just about every. And, according to new data, everyone’s getting in on the game. We love reports that provide an insightful view into what the bad guys are doing, quantifying what we’re all experiencing as an industry. A new report from threat intelligence firm Group-IB entitled Ransomware Uncovered 2020-2021 sheds some much needed light on the current state of not just attacks, but the specific methods and techniques used in today’s ransomware attacks. According to the report: The average ransom in 2020 was $170,000; up from $80,000 in 2019 The average dwell time on a victim network was 13 days The average downtime resulting...

Cyber Insurance is might not Cover that $6 Million in Cyber Fraud

Think Your Cyber Insurance is Going to Cover that $6 Million attack in Cyber Fraud? Think Again.

The latest tale of an organization falling victim to a business email compromise cyber attack on their credit card processor highlights how very specific the scenario needs to be to see a payout.  In 2018, RealPage, a Texas-based service provider for property owners and property management companies was the victim of a cyber attack that took the company for $6 million. RealPage processed their credit card transactions through a third-party processor, Stripe. Stripe fell victim to an impersonation attack where cybercriminals gained control over a RealPage user’s credentials and convinced Stripe to modify the disbursement instructions to point to a bad guy-controlled bank account. In total, $10 million was sent to the fraudulent account, with $4 million recovered. In...

Phishing Attacks Continue to Impersonate Trusted Brands to Deceive Potential Victims

Phishing Attacks Continue to Impersonate Trusted Brands to Deceive Potential Victims

The use of impersonation in phishing attacks helps to establish credibility and a sense of ease. New data shows exactly how the bad guys are using this tactic to their advantage. We’ve covered impersonation scams before where cybercriminals pretend to be your CEO, hospital personnel, or even the government. New data from cybersecurity vendor Agari highlights the impersonation trends they found by looking at email throughout the second half of 2020. 63% percent of phishing emails impersonate trusted brands (with Microsoft continuing to top the list). This breaks down in the following manner: Brand display impersonation (62.6%)– where the display name looks to be UPS, Microsoft, Amazon, etc. Individual display name impersonation (22.1%) – where the display name represents...

88% Of Data Breaches Are Caused By Human Error

88% Of Data Breaches Are Caused By Human Error

A brand new report confirms what we have been saying for many years now. About 9 out 10 data breaches are caused by your users. Researchers from Stanford University and a top cybersecurity organization found that approximately 88 percent of all data breaches are caused by an employee mistake. Human error is still very much the driving force behind an overwhelming majority of cybersecurity problems. The study was done by  Stanford University Professor Jeff Hancock and security firm Tessian. The study “Psychology of Human Error” highlighted that employees are unwilling to admit to their mistakes if organizations judge them severely. Understanding the psychology behind human errors helps organizations to know how to prevent mistakes before they turn into data leaks. According...

Phishing Emails Are After Credentials

Most Phishing Emails Are After Credentials

Most Phishing Emails Are After Credentials 57% of phishing emails in 2020 were designed for stealing credentials, according to Cofense’s most recent Annual State of Phishing Report. Meanwhile, just 12% of phishing attacks last year were used for delivering malware. Cofense believes this is because credential phishing emails are better at bypassing email security filters than emails with malicious attachments or download links. Likewise, conversational phishing attacks, like business email compromise (BEC), have grown more popular. “The vast majority of phishing campaigns are credential theft or conversational,” Cofense says. “While malicious attachments still play a role in phishing, the frequency of this has dramatically declined over the years. In fact, most phish attachments these days are not even malware, but...

Cybersecurity: Hacking Proprietary Protocols with Sharks and Pandas

Cybersecurity: Hacking Proprietary Protocols with Sharks and Pandas

There is a constant war which plagues cybersecurity; perhaps not only in cybersecurity, but in the world all around us is a battle between good and evil.  In cybersecurity if the “evil” side understands or pays more attention to a technology than the “good” side, we see a spike in cyber-attacks. The human race commonly fears what it doesn’t understand.  In a time of war, this fear is even greater if one side understands a weapon or technology that the other side does not. This course of events demands that both offensively and defensively minded “good guys” band together to remove the unknown from as much technology as possible. One of the most common unknown pieces of technology in...

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